David Boshoff, CEO, Bravus reports jobs increase to 2000

Carmichael Job Numbers Surpass 2000 with Bravus

Melbourne, November 27: More than 2,000 people are now working at Bravus Mining and Resources’ Carmichael Project in Central Queensland where construction activity is now at peak level.

Bravus (earlier Adani) CEO David Boshoff said he was delighted to report that the project was able to deliver more jobs than previously expected.

“We have always said that the Carmichael Project would be a major generator of jobs and now we are at peak construction levels employing more than 2,000 people onsite,” he said.

“The Stop Adani movement said our project would never go ahead and would never create a single job. We have again proved our opponents wrong.

“Our project and the Queensland coal industry is powering the State economy, we are putting money in the pockets of workers, and businesses in north and central Queensland,” Mr Boshoff added.

In a statement issued by Carmichael, it said that increased job numbers would help families and communities, keeps shops open and gives people hope for the future so they can plan ahead, whether that means buying a house, taking a holiday or expanding their business.

“It is wonderful for all our team to be a part of that and to see the benefits investment in mining and infrastructure can bring. We are very proud to be making a difference,” Mr Boshoff said proudly.

Additionally, Bravus Mining and Resources Carmichael Project supports a further 9,000 indirect jobs* in the community,” with the Project’s accommodation camps brimming with workers.

The jobs announcement coincided with a project milestone for Bravus as the first controlled blast occurring onsite this week.

Carmichael Project has now awarded more than $1.5 billion in contracts, and 90 per cent of those are being delivered by Queensland-based contractors, from Rockhampton and Townsville, to Mackay, Clermont, Collinsville, Gladstone and Toowoomba.

“We have done our best to ensure Queensland businesses are reaping the economic rewards of the Carmichael Project,” Mr Boshoff noted.

The rail camp operations are based in Collinsville; earthworks and civil works contractors are from Townsville and Rockhampton; fuel supply from Townsville; telecommunications from Mackay; rail track laying and rail camp construction from Rockhampton, and quarry contracts going to Toowoomba.

Mr Boshoff noted that the Bravus team used strict safety and environmental controls and regulations.

“We always have very strict safety and environmental measures in place at our mine site… so that our neighbours and local flora and fauna are not disrupted,” he said.

It is expected that other permanent jobs will be in place with the operation of the mine and railways.

“We are looking forward to producing our first coal in 2021,” he said.

Meanwhile, North QLD locals halted work at Adani’s coal port in Bowen.

Jeanette Kemp, an ecologist from Townsville and Rupert Russell, an 81-year-old naturalist from Mount Molloy, near Cairns, are stopping work this morning at Adani’s Abbott Point Port in Bowen by attaching themselves to coal loading infrastructure.

Kemp, who has worked around the area where the Adani Carmichael mine is being built says, “I know a fair bit of that country where the mine is and got to know the vegetation through my work as an ecologist.

Also Read: Activist Kyle Magee halts work at Adani Coal Terminal

“It’s just crazy to me that we’re going to dig up this whole area. There are too many mines that are damaging our land, and I just don’t want to see Queensland go that way”.

Russell, a retiree, urged others to take action like him by saying, “I’m in a very lucky position. I don’t have to worry about my job so I have the time to do this.

“It’s only by having enough people taking the time to commit to this kind of action that the message of ‘the people don’t want coal to continue’ can be heard”.

* The company based their numbers on an economic modelling, used by the Queensland Resources Council, which shows that each direct job in the industry in Queensland supports another four and a half jobs in related industries and businesses.

Comments are closed, but trackbacks and pingbacks are open.